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via NYT Lens - Alex Webb: Rendering a Complex World, in Color and Black-and-White

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For someone who says 99 percent of street photography is about failure, Alex Webb has had a notably successful career.

via The New York Times - The Subway Shuffle

Commuters at the 34th Street subway platform try to guess which of two trains will leave first, darting across the platform with mixed results.

I always get mine

Filed in: 34th street herald square q train nytimes new york times


via NYT Lens Blog - Breaking Into Prison

Sean Kernan’s noirish photo essay on prison life was not the result of careful planning, research or even an interest in issues of incarceration.

It was a crime of opportunity.

Filed in: nytimes lens blog sean kernan prison

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via NYT Lens Blog - Breaking Into Prison
Sean Kernan’s noirish photo essay on prison life was not the result of careful planning, research or even an interest in issues of incarceration.
It was a crime of opportunity.

via NYT Lens Blog - A Lonely Gaze on The Times and Its City by Robert Frank

In 1958, the promotion department of The New York Times hired a young Swiss expat to take pictures that were collected in a slim hardcover book for prospective advertisers. The book, “New York Is,” extolled the virtues of the city and of the newspaper as the best way to tap its prosperous postwar consumers.

Filed in: nytimes lens blog robert frank new york nyc

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via NYT Lens Blog - A Lonely Gaze on The Times and Its City by Robert Frank
In 1958, the promotion department of The New York Times hired a young Swiss expat to take pictures that were collected in a slim hardcover book for prospective advertisers. The book, “New York Is,” extolled the virtues of the city and of the newspaper as the best way to tap its prosperous postwar consumers.

via NYT Lens Blog - On the Beat: With a Gun and a Camera

Photo by Anthonio Bolfo

There are all sorts of reasons why people become New York City police officers. Tradition. Family ties. The pension. Antonio Bolfo’s reasoning was simple.

“I was bored,” he said.

It was 2006, and Mr. Bolfo – a born-and-bred New Yorker with a degree from the Rhode Island School of Design – was an animator working on PlayStation games like Guitar Hero and Amplitude. Still, he was unfulfilled. The attack on the World Trade Center had gotten him thinking about law enforcement.

“It’s not a cop drama where it’s just black and white,” he said. “Cops grow, and this is where they learn their skills and have a trial by fire. They’re put in the most dangerous neighborhoods in New York City. They have to learn superfast.”

By Michael Wilson

Filed in: nytimes lens blog anthony bolfo police nypd new york nyc

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via NYT Lens Blog - On the Beat: With a Gun and a Camera
Photo by Anthonio Bolfo
There are all sorts of reasons why people become New York City police officers. Tradition. Family ties. The pension. Antonio Bolfo’s reasoning was simple.

“I was bored,” he said.

It was 2006, and Mr. Bolfo – a born-and-bred New Yorker with a degree from the Rhode Island School of Design – was an animator working on PlayStation games like Guitar Hero and Amplitude. Still, he was unfulfilled. The attack on the World Trade Center had gotten him thinking about law enforcement.

“It’s not a cop drama where it’s just black and white,” he said. “Cops grow, and this is where they learn their skills and have a trial by fire. They’re put in the most dangerous neighborhoods in New York City. They have to learn superfast.”

By Michael Wilson

photo by Tony Cenicola

via New York Times - Where Home Tours Don’t Go

THERE are precious few real estate secrets in the United States. Web sites have turned nearly every neighborhood into a big open-house, with slide shows, video tours and price histories, while celebrities, from A-listers to D-listers, regularly open their doors to TV cameras and magazine photographers.

But here in Mexico, only vacation properties receive such treatment. The homes where well-heeled Mexicans actually live are usually surrounded by gates or walls that guard residents’ privacy and protect against intruders. And none are more hidden than the homes owned by the country’s drug lords.

Filed in: nytimes mexico drug lord homes inspiration

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photo by Tony Cenicola
via New York Times - Where Home Tours Don’t Go
THERE are precious few real estate secrets in the United States. Web sites have turned nearly every neighborhood into a big open-house, with slide shows, video tours and price histories, while celebrities, from A-listers to D-listers, regularly open their doors to TV cameras and magazine photographers.
But here in Mexico, only vacation properties receive such treatment. The homes where well-heeled Mexicans actually live are usually surrounded by gates or walls that guard residents’ privacy and protect against intruders. And none are more hidden than the homes owned by the country’s drug lords.

cohort Kristen Joy Watts for NYT Lens

via NYT Lens - More of the Same — but Different

The hill in question — in Lincoln Park in Chicago, overlooking Lake Michigan — is not very big, and didn’t occur naturally. It was born in the 1940s, when a pile of dirt was moved to make room for a tunnel.

When Mr. Octavious first saw the hill, not too far from where he lives in the city, he felt an immediate connection. “When I was little in class and I drew a hill,” he said, “I would draw that shape. That’s the hill in my head.”

Filed in: nytimes lens blog kristen joy watts paul octavious inspiration

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cohort Kristen Joy Watts for NYT Lens
via NYT Lens - More of the Same — but Different
The hill in question — in Lincoln Park in Chicago, overlooking Lake Michigan — is not very big, and didn’t occur naturally. It was born in the 1940s, when a pile of dirt was moved to make room for a tunnel.
When Mr. Octavious first saw the hill, not too far from where he lives in the city, he felt an immediate connection. “When I was little in class and I drew a hill,” he said, “I would draw that shape. That’s the hill in my head.”

Murder on the roof. Auguest 13th, 1941. ~~>

via NYT Lens - Weegee’s Killer Decade

On the lineup platform at the police headquarters. Circa 1936.

Steps away from the sanitized, commercialized and pacified Times Square is a portal to a sinister urban past, where two-bit hoods lay sprawled in pools of blood with stogies clenched in their lifeless jaws, watched over by the police and the curious alike. It’s a world of men with guns and hats who played their final hands under elevated tracks and tenements that have long since vanished.

Filed in: nytimes lens blog weegee inspiration

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Murder on the roof. Auguest 13th, 1941. ~~>
via NYT Lens - Weegee’s Killer Decade

On the lineup platform at the police headquarters. Circa 1936.
Steps away from the sanitized, commercialized and pacified Times Square is a portal to a sinister urban past, where two-bit hoods lay sprawled in pools of blood with stogies clenched in their lifeless jaws, watched over by the police and the curious alike. It’s a world of men with guns and hats who played their final hands under elevated tracks and tenements that have long since vanished.

via NYT Lens - Washing Dishes, Herding Reindeer by Erika Larsen

“I wanted to live with this original hunter-gatherer, nomadic society in the modern world,” she said. “I didn’t want to just go and do a photo project; I really wanted to live with them. I wanted to learn what they do…

To really start to understand what my images had been teaching me, I needed to really learn the language.”

Filed in: inspiration lens blog nytimes erika larsen reindeer sami Scandinavia

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via NYT Lens - Washing Dishes, Herding Reindeer by Erika Larsen
“I wanted to live with this original hunter-gatherer, nomadic society in the modern world,” she said. “I didn’t want to just go and do a photo project; I really wanted to live with them. I wanted to learn what they do…
To really start to understand what my images had been teaching me, I needed to really learn the language.”

via NYT Lens - Lost and Alone Under Tokyo’s Red Rain by HIROYUKI ITO

"Soon after shooting memorial concerts on the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, my sister called to tell me that our father had died unexpectedly. Two days later, I returned to Japan for the first time in 20 years to attend his funeral. I felt constant vertigo, like I had been violently cut and pasted from New York to Tokyo."

Filed in: lens blog nytimes hiroyuki ito journalism inspiration

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via NYT Lens - Lost and Alone Under Tokyo’s Red Rain by HIROYUKI ITO
"Soon after shooting memorial concerts on the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, my sister called to tell me that our father had died unexpectedly. Two days later, I returned to Japan for the first time in 20 years to attend his funeral. I felt constant vertigo, like I had been violently cut and pasted from New York to Tokyo."

Kent State University, 1970. Original photo: John Filo

via NYT Lens - Iconic Scenes, Revisited and Reimagined

In the project “Fatescapes,” the visual artist Pavel Maria Smejkal goes a step further and forces us to reconsider the veracity of historical images and the photographer’s role by digitally removing the people that made these images resonant. What is left is the scene as it might have looked just minutes before or after the photographer passed by. These images are reminiscent of a time, before Photoshop, when photographs were believed to be a reflection of reality. Mr. Smejkal’s alterations question whether photographs should be viewed as accurate representation.

“I tend to think about historical processes as something really fatal,” he said, “Something much bigger than we are.”

Filed in: nytimes lens blog inspiration

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Kent State University, 1970. Original photo: John Filo
via NYT Lens - Iconic Scenes, Revisited and Reimagined
In the project “Fatescapes,” the visual artist Pavel Maria Smejkal goes a step further and forces us to reconsider the veracity of historical images and the photographer’s role by digitally removing the people that made these images resonant. What is left is the scene as it might have looked just minutes before or after the photographer passed by. These images are reminiscent of a time, before Photoshop, when photographs were believed to be a reflection of reality. Mr. Smejkal’s alterations question whether photographs should be viewed as accurate representation.
“I tend to think about historical processes as something really fatal,” he said, “Something much bigger than we are.”

via NYT Lens - Alex Webb’s Dialogue With the Streets

“I’m looking for photos that have a greater level of ambiguity,” he said. “It’s more a matter of questioning or enigma than we usually associate with photojournalism, whatever that is. I’m looking for photos that ask questions. I’m not sure I’m able to provide an answer, but you ask a lot of good questions.”

Filed in: nytimes lens blog alex webb inspiration journalism

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via NYT Lens - Alex Webb’s Dialogue With the Streets
“I’m looking for photos that have a greater level of ambiguity,” he said. “It’s more a matter of questioning or enigma than we usually associate with photojournalism, whatever that is. I’m looking for photos that ask questions. I’m not sure I’m able to provide an answer, but you ask a lot of good questions.”